Newtown Union Health

Political parties endorsing the Health Charter

Posted on Updated on

Over the last month UCAN chair person Debbie Leyland has asked each political party if they would consider endorsing the UCAN Health Charter.

UCAN is happy to announce that the following parties have endorsed the charter and have also confirmed that they will work with UCAN and other networks to implant the charter.

unnamed-1.pngunnamed.png

image.pngGreen-Logo-Green-WEB.jpg

UCAN members look forward to meeting with these parties after the election to make the UCAN Health Charter a cornerstone in a health system we can all be proud of.

UCAN also would like to take this opportunity to acknowledge the public endorsements of the NZNO – New Zealands Nurses Organization, The Equality Network, Porirua Union and Community Health Service, Hutt Union Health Service, Newtown Union Health Service, Department of Public Health at the School of Otago in Wellington, the Wellington branch of the Public Health Association and the College of Nurses Aotearoa NZ.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

UCAN is affiliated to no political party.

Fewer and fewer New Zealanders able to access the health care they need, when they need it.

Posted on Updated on

For release on Thursday 14 February 2013

The United Community Action Network (UCAN), which was established to protest cuts to community based primary health care services is concerned that the people who need health care the most in this country are becoming less and less able to access it.

UCAN spokesperson, Debbie Leyland says, “The Government keeps telling us that the health of our children is a priority but everything they are doing shows that they couldn’t care less. Free health care for children has been extended but in many communities there is nowhere to get it from.”

“Funding is being slashed to community health providers who work with refugees, migrants and those on low incomes, and many are being forced to cut services. Last year Newtown Union Health lost its midwifery services because of a 7.8 percent cut to it budget.”

“UCAN is not the only group worried about the impact of health equity. Tomorrow the Royal NZ College of General Practitioners is holding a quality symposium with a focus on how to influence improvements in children’s health and at the Living Wage symposium people from all around the country are coming together to make the links between a decent living wage and health and well-being,” Leyland says.

“UCAN believes that there is a clear need for community-based publically-funded health services that are focussed on providing health care to everyone who needs it, when they need it, where they need it.”

“We urge the Minister of Health to walk the talk. Prioritising children means prioritising the health of children and their families. And that means funding the services that will improve the health and well-being of every child, no matter where they live or what their families’ income is.”

ENDS

SCOOP Link